My top 3 Transitional Toys (from Babies to Early School-age)

There are those toys as moms that we keep during every spring cleaning fest we have. Toys we just can’t get rid of because our different aged children ranging from babies to early school-age (7 yo) still continue to play with.

My top 3 transitional toys:

Blocks

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I have had these blocks, since Apollo was a toddler. I have kept them, year after year, and he continues to play with them even know at eight. We ended up adding to the set, for Artemis. She got a few sets as gifts on her first birthday, and her first Christmas. There is a bin (old art bin) full of blocks, and  an original bag that Apollo’s blocks came in. All I do is wash it once a month, with part water, and a few tablespoon of bleach. I wash it with warm water and soap first, and sanitize it with the water and bleach mix. I let it dry overnight, and make sure that there are no water left in the slots. Blocks are so versatile, that they can be utilized in different aspects of learning. 

Blocks can be used for sorting, counting, and colours, which encourages learning math. Blocks can also be incorporated with our toys like, toy soldiers who used them as structures to jump from, seats for dolls, tables for miniature toys, etc..

Blocks are great at any age! 

Pretend Toys – Food & Kitchen Utensils

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Pretend play is a very big part of play in children. Children love to pretend-play with all sorts of toys, but one common toy that is used for every kind of pretend-play from baker and chef, to mommy and daddy picnics, to imitation of feeding babies are, food toys and kitchen utensils. It doesn’t get old. It continues to be played with, on a regular. Sometimes the kids even go through my drawers to use actual utensils, cups, plastic plates they use for eating. Food toys also contribute to school-age children in teaching them the types of food and what food family they belong in. I know having a picky eater, helps me in connecting the food he eats, with the toys he’s seen. Most of the time, after the food is cooked, and the kids weren’t part of the process, they wonder why the outcome looks so weird. Well utilizing the food toys as tangible examples (especially the ones that cut in half with pretend knives) makes it a little bit comforting for them. 

It’s definitely an awesome keep! 

Balls

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We all know balls are universal. Anyone and everyone can keep them as long as they haven’t deflated. The collection of balls we have from the time Apollo could learn to just hold them, has tripled if not, more. From tennis balls, to soccer balls, to basketballs, to volleyballs, to balls that collect water for summer, to light-weight balls co-used with other toys, playing with balls are just great fun (back it up, you know what I meant), anytime.

Artemis is now into kicking it around, and she gets all these ideas and sees all these moves from her older brother, so having balls around are so perfect for gross-motor skills and active play. Artemis is learning to push the ball to Cassiopeia, where Cassiopeia then learns to stop it and picks it up or even chases it. These are all part of learning. From baby to school-age, balls provide learning for every step in their milestones. 

Children are able to utilize their motor skills according to the size of the ball, the weight of the ball, and eventually categorize the type of ball that it is. Promoting learning through physical activity. 

So, yes, I keep them as long as they’re in good condition.

There are a ton of other toys my kids love, and I’m sure your kids as well. The most important thing is keeping the ones that can grow with them and utilizing them regulary by incorporating them with other toys, and different types of play. 

 

What are some of the toys you keep on every big cleaning session, you do?


 

MM, out!

 

 

 

 

  One thought on “My top 3 Transitional Toys (from Babies to Early School-age)

  1. March 14, 2017 at 3:30 am

    you’ll find a lot of blocks and balls at our house too!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. March 13, 2017 at 4:09 pm

    This is our list too. These toys never seem to get old. The only thing that would be added for my daughter is stuffed animals. She LOVES them!

    Liked by 1 person

    • March 13, 2017 at 9:01 pm

      Oh yes..those are a hit with my 2 year old i feel like im swimming in them and find them in every nook

      Like

  3. March 13, 2017 at 3:02 pm

    This is a great idea. There are few toys that have grown with my kids as they have gotten a bit older.. but kitchen pretend play toys and blocks (legos) are a few of them.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. March 12, 2017 at 6:02 pm

    Definitely blocks. For us also Brio train track and trains, lego and jigsaws x The electric bubble blowing machine also never gets old!

    Like

  5. March 12, 2017 at 4:34 pm

    Love that these are all old school toys that I used to play with! None of that super high tech nonsense that I can’t even figure out half of the time. We have the little stacking rings that my son mostly just chews on right now (lol!) and he loves them.

    Liked by 1 person

    • March 12, 2017 at 5:16 pm

      Honestly toys are toys. Their meant to be used according to their age. So if your baby is chewing it up right now..in a few months your baby will figure out how to manipulate them accordingly..but ring toys can also be used for its colours, sorting with other toys…and honestly the super high tech ones have its purpose..but not all children find them interesting or is appropriate for their current interests. At the end of the day, simple toys serve their purpose. Thanks for stopping by mama.

      Like

  6. March 12, 2017 at 3:48 pm

    This is such a great list! I have a 3 month old and I will definitely be keeping this in mind. The blocks are so true too… My sister has a 3 year old and a 1 year old and they both LOVE the same blocks.

    Liked by 1 person

    • March 12, 2017 at 5:21 pm

      Thank you! They’re great! They use them for colour sorting (big brother usually helps his 2 yr old sister with that), the baby (1 yr old) is learning to build, helps her with how to pick-up, hold, and even throw. Aside from sorting for colour, they use them to count, they even utilize it as structures incorporating them with their other toys. Its such a versatile toy!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. March 12, 2017 at 2:29 am

    Thank you for this list! My little man is 4 months old so I’m hoping to start stocking up on more toys that he can use when he’s older, especially educational ones that help promote his development.

    Liked by 1 person

    • March 12, 2017 at 2:31 am

      Remember while its important to have toys that he can transition to, he also requires age-appropriate toys to help with motor skills..grabbing, holding, shaking..but yes mama these are awesome toys anytime. Keeps them busy and their imagination growing.

      Like

  8. March 12, 2017 at 12:44 am

    “Play builds brain” and when it comes to toys, you can’t get much better than these. Great list- not only are these fantastic transitional toys, they’re open ended, allowing the kiddos to use their imagination to learn.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. mdhippiemama
    March 12, 2017 at 12:14 am

    Blocks are a huge hit at our house. The baby plays with big, fabric ones. The toddler plays with wood and Mega, and the older two play with Lego.

    • March 12, 2017 at 12:50 am

      Legos,mega blocks, and the wooden ones are totally fun to play with. There’s nothing you cant do with them..even stepping on it! 😂

      Like

  10. March 11, 2017 at 7:13 pm

    I agree! 100%.
    Our faves are blocks too – not quite at the Lego stage yet.
    We also love our activity table/cube!

    Liked by 1 person

    • March 11, 2017 at 7:40 pm

      I could have probably chosen more toys but i found these toys recycle through their play time –a lot, even with the baby

      Liked by 1 person

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